The Difference between Autism and Asperger’s Syndrome

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Several years ago, “Asperger’s syndrome” was adopted as part of an umbrella term that’s now used to refer to all cases of autism, autism spectrum disorder or ASD. Up until 2013, Asperger’s syndrome was generally used to refer to people who had a high functioning type of autism.

Because people are no longer diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome in many instances, some find themselves wondering, “Is Asperger’s a type of autism after all?” The answer to that question is a resounding yes.

Autism vs Asperger’s: How Are They Different from One Another?

While people diagnosed with Asperger’s or the relative type of autism on the condition’s spectrum still have autism, they often exhibit different signs. Their symptoms may also present at different stages of life.

Age of Diagnosis

Because children with autism ordinarily experience trouble with language at an early age, they are often diagnosed with the condition much earlier, sometimes as toddlers if not earlier. Kids with autism are usually diagnosed before they’re old enough to attend school, whereas children with Asperger’s syndrome may be well into elementary school or even further before they’re diagnosed. In fact, some people with the latter condition may not be diagnosed until they’re well into their adult years.

Similarities between Asperger’s and Autism

While there are some key differences between Asperger’s and other levels of autism, the two have some things in common. Individuals with either condition may experience hypersensitivities to certain things like bright lights, sounds, taste and touch, for example.

They may have difficulties in social situations, particularly those that are new to them as well. Anxiety, depression, clumsiness and difficulty interpreting nonverbal communication cues may also prove difficult for people who have Asperger’s or another level of autism.

Judson Center: We Help Individuals and Their Families

No matter what level of autism your child is diagnosed with, we know the news can be devastating for your entire family. That’s why Judson Center is dedicated to providing care for all family members who are impacted by an autism diagnosis, including individual patients and their siblings and parents.

While we offer special programs and counseling for family members, we provide at-center and in-home ABA treatment for patients. We also offer kids with autism the chance to attend innovative Summer Programs that help patients advance their skills even further in a variety of areas.

Get in touch with Judson Center to learn more about the treatment and support we provide for children with all levels of autism and their families now!

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